FIVE CRM

Sales voicemails and how to perfect them!

Sales voicemails and how to perfect them!

In an age where effective communication for sales people is done over emails and messages, cold calling or leaving voicemails for prospects can be hard. So, why should you waste time in creating the perfect voicemail when there isn’t much response?

While the number of responses may be less than other mediums, voicemails pose an important part of client communication. The biggest reason for this is the fact that voicemails are quality rich, if not quantity rich. You may not get a lot of calls back, but the calls you do get will be from prospects with a higher level of interest.

But we all know leaving a voicemail isn’t as simple as that. Here are some pro tips to help you craft the perfect voicemail that gets responses.

Length of the voicemail

The voicemail that you leave should not be too long or chances are the prospect might never listen to it. The sweet spot for voicemails falls between 20 to 30 seconds, as anything longer than that seems time consuming and anything shorter than that seem irrelevant or less important for them to hear.

Mobile phones these days show the length of the voicemail along with the number it came from, so ensure to follow this rule. This length helps instill just the right amount of curiosity and makes the prospect feel they aren’t wasting time.

Another trick to try is splitting your voicemail into two parts. For instance, you can leave a first voicemail of 20 seconds that contains the crux of the conversation, and then leave a second 10 second one with just your contact details.

Doing this split can help you seem less rehearsed and that you aren’t following a script. It will also help you stand out from the other sales reps trying to get through!

Watch your pace and tone

The receiver of the voicemail will only be hearing your voice relay the message you are trying to get across, so make sure you talk in a calm and comfortable manner. Most sales reps are asked to sound super excited or enthusiastic, which leaves them with a high pitched, unnatural voice.

Avoid using an artificial voice and stick to your natural one instead. Sound professional but not stern, and keep your pace steady. In fact, it is a good idea to slightly reduce your speaking pace and speak more deliberately as you record your message. This is because it intrigues the listener and the chances are they will most likely finish hearing the voicemail.

If you talk in a hurried tone, the receiver may think they are just another name on your list of people to call, and they feel exempted from responding back because you’re probably leaving the same voicemail to countless people. The key here is to make the prospect feel special and show them that you’re actually concerned about their issues.

Always start with relevant information

As with every piece of communication with prospects, the start of your voicemail needs to be gripping or 5 seconds into the message, the receiver will delete it. Most reps start by introducing themselves and the company they are calling from. While this seems professional, it rarely gets you a call back.

No one wants to waste time listening to a message about someone else’s products, that too from an unknown person. So, to retain the listener’s attention, you must begin your voicemail with information that is relevant to them.

The moment the prospect realises it is a sales pitch, they will hit the delete button so instead start with a relevant question or thought proving statement that will make them hear it through.

Always leave a voicemail

Whether or not you are prepared with the perfect voicemail, always leave one when the prospect doesn’t answer their phone. If they see a missed call on their phone along with no voicemail, the chances of them ignoring the call are higher as it may seem that the call wasn’t important to begin with.

Even if you call multiple times, leaving a voicemail lets the prospect know who you are, and you are at least on their radar and not instantly ignored.

The right time to leave a voicemail

According to the Serial Position Effect, people are most likely to remember the first and last items on a list. Using this, it is possible that prospects may remember reps who called them first thing or last thing in the day, as opposed to ones who called in the afternoon. But we all know the hustle and bustle of work mornings, and it is likely that a voicemail will be ignored if sent in the morning.

This is why the best time to send a voicemail to prospects is at the end of the work day. Not only will they have more time to hear it over, they may even get back to you later at night or first thing the next day, as your voicemail is fresh in their mind.

Keep your emails and voicemails separate

Since sales reps use multiple forms of communication with prospects, it is ideal to keep them separate. This means that you should not repeat the questions or concerns you raise in an email, in a voicemail also otherwise the point of the voicemail is redundant.

While both emails and voicemails should be personal or relevant to the prospect, voicemails should be super specific to the listener so that they are compelled to hear more or reply back.

The perfect close

Try to stay away from traditional closes for your voicemails. Saying things like, “Please call me when you get this” seems desperate and needy. Instead, simply end by thanking them or better yet ending with your phone number. Since that’s the last thing they hear, they will most likely remember to call you back.

The goal of the voicemail is to keep the conversation going so you can also end by telling them that you will get in touch over email to do so. Make connections from experience and say something like, “I would love to hear more about XYZ when we talk next” to give you a point of reference to pick up on next time.

Perfecting the art of leaving the right voicemail can take a little time, but the best bet is to be engaging, relevant and not pushy. Use these above tips as a way to get more calls back and increase your chances of converting prospects.

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